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HoboBen
Created : 22 January 2010
Edited : 22 January 2010

YouTube HTML5 Video Player

an opt-in experiment for HTML5 support on YouTub

http://www.youtube.com/html5
"This is an opt-in experiment for HTML5 support on YouTube. If you are using a supported browser, you can choose to use the HTML5 player instead of the Flash player for most videos"

Though admittedly Firefox won't work as it can't support the propriety codec that Google is using. Google, in fairness, are using the codec because it uses the lowest bandwidth at their picture quality.

More discussion at reddit

Comments


Friday, 22 January 2010, 06:00
Jayenkai
I noticed this, yesterday, but there's no fullscreen though...
Boooo! (They're working on it, apparently)
Friday, 22 January 2010, 06:42
JL235
HoboBen Though admittedly Firefox won't work as it can't support the propriety codec that Google is using. Google, in fairness, are using the codec because it uses the lowest bandwidth at their picture quality.

So I presume it's Chrome only? This sounds very similar to the browser specific extensions IE and NetScape used to do years ago.
Friday, 22 January 2010, 06:50
HoboBen
No, any HTML 5 browser supporting the H264 (IIRC, it's H2-something!) codec. Currently Chrome, Safari and IE-with-chrome-frame-installed.

No reason why Opera won't jump aboard, and entirely possible Mozilla will change their mind for FF 3.7 (ogg thedora is already supported)
Friday, 22 January 2010, 07:55
Jayenkai
Yeah, this is more a Codec issue than a "Browser" issue.
Like every other media player out there, we'll just have to wait for "The right one" before all the browsers decide to agree on one.

I'd trust Google to have picked the right one, though, since they're having to deal with all the Youtube bandwidth, and all of that.
Friday, 22 January 2010, 15:12
HoboBen
Indeed - Google would have preferred an open codec like ogg thedora but bandwidth was their main concern (understandably so!)

If I could make a prediction though, I reckon (and hope!) that Google develop their own open codec.

They've developed their own replacements for things before, e.g. a new compression algorithm called Courgette for Chrome updates that is about ten times better than the diff algorithm they were using previously.
Friday, 22 January 2010, 16:12
Sticky
Sweet, now I won't have to suffer through 100% CPU usage by flash for all the videos that support it.