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SoCoder -> Snippet Home -> Collisions and Physics

Scherererer
Created : 12 September 2010
 
System : Windows
Language : Blitz

Soft Body Physics

Simple demo of roughly how soft bodies work

This demo is very rudimentary, but basically it demonstrates kind of how soft bodies work. The basic idea is to pretend that the lines connecting vertices have on them a spring and a damper. Then, when a force is exerted on some point (or series of points), that force can be reflected across the other points.

More points means more realistic looking surfaces.

Spring coefficient [0,1]: higher number->more spring, lower number->less spring

Damping coefficient [0,1]: higher number->more damping; not to be confused with less springyness.

"spring" resists displacement, whereas "damping" resists change in displacement (velocity).

The forces applied effect the change in the change in displacement (change in velocity (acceleration))

See Calculus:erivatives and Wikipedia: Damping for more on this.

The spring/dampers in this example are only connected along the square "grid" lines, however in typical/modern configurations, additional connections are made on the diagonals and over other points to compensate for polygon folding and other issues.


Comments


Sunday, 12 September 2010, 23:48
Jayenkai
ooooh, bouncy!