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Socoder -> C/C++/C#/Other -> Graphics Libraries

Sat, 09 Jul 2011, 12:49
jedimastersterli
Shroom suggested that I try SFML as a graphics library, so I took a look at my compiler and it supports direct/x, GLFW, GLUT, Irrlicht, Lightfeather, Ogre, OpenGL, SDL, and SFML graphics projects. I know nothing about any of these, I can look up information about them, but I trust personal experience more. I'm trying to make 2D physical simulators, and i'm wondering if anyone has any experience and could point me in the right direction. What's the difference? How do i go about learning it? Are they easy to switch between or would each one be like learning a new sub-language?
Sat, 09 Jul 2011, 17:35
mindstorm8191
The only way I know to learn any of these is to rely on online sources such as tutorials and documentation. That may be the largest factor in choosing which library you choose, because if you can't find help on something its that much harder to use (if you can at all).

From my personal experience, OpenGL is full-featured but hard to learn. DirectX I don't know of many knowledge sources. Irrlicht I've used once but didn't learn much from. I haven't ever used any of the others - I used Blitz3D primarily, it handled everything I needed. Not sure how much that'll help you, but that's my experience.

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Vesuvius web game
Sun, 10 Jul 2011, 04:38
Afr0
DirectX I don't know of many knowledge sources


Microsoft has online articles for all possible aspects of DirectX.

You can find some here

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Afr0 Games

Project Dollhouse on Github - Please fork!
Sun, 10 Jul 2011, 04:54
JL235
mindstorm8191 The only way I know to learn any of these is to rely on online sources such as tutorials and documentation.

There are also books, and I personally find a big fat book on a topic always out weighs any online sources. It tends to be more consistent and more complete. But I would avoid any 'game building' type books, and instead only pick up any that solely concentrate on DirectX, OpenGL or on using x-library.

Books that try to teach library, language and game building in general tend to do all three to a lower standard then books that concentrate on one specific topic.

For DirectX there is also DirectX Tutorial.com. The early ones are free, but you have to pay for the later ones. I believe Spare has paid for them, so you could ask him if it's worth it or not.
Sun, 10 Jul 2011, 17:28
jedimastersterli
In my experience teach yourself books are expensive, and groggy. I bought one on how to code C++ and after the hundredth program about a cat named Frisky i shelved it permanently. The online tutorial i'm learning from now works just fine, and there's always the option of asking another source if it doesn't explain well.

From what i'm hearing the features don't matter as much as documentation. Now i just need documentation on how to use the free libraries that came with my Code::Blocks compiler. The setup windows differ from everything i've seen online, and damned if i know what they mean when they ask for base member.
Sun, 10 Jul 2011, 17:45
JL235
It depends greatly on the book. Good books beat the best online tutorials hands down. The problem is that in recent years there are a lot of "learn C++ game programming" type books, which are basic C++ with basic game programming and basic graphics.

The best books don't talk about game programming at all, instead it's all OpenGL, DirectX, SDL, C++, whatever. Essentially 400 pages on one topic, rather then 3 or 4.
Sun, 10 Jul 2011, 23:25
shroom_monk
By the sounds of things you used the same book as I did, and it worked fine for me. Don't give up on it! If you're finding it too difficult, slow down - you need to understand the earlier ideas to understand the later ideas fully, so go back and make sure you can see what a piece of code is doing before continuing. Programming is a lot about patience. And, from experience, I can tell you that a lot of things in the later part of that book (the advanced pointer stuff and other more complex stuff) is not an important part of C++ at the stage you're at, so you could always try learning just the basic areas near the start of the book, then come back to the later stuff when you're more confident.

-=-=-
A mushroom a day keeps the doctor away...

Keep It Simple, Shroom!
Tue, 12 Jul 2011, 10:51
jedimastersterli
My patience, as it has proved, was fine. I started programming again a week ago, and now i can read c++ and write simple stuff without even thinking about it. Back then i was always looking back in the book, and was ready to shoot myself every time i saw the word frisky. The difference was that the online tutorial i used passed over ideas quickly, if not very thoroughly, and gave relevant applications. The book went into gratuitous detail of even the most simple ideas. I was confused before i even started writing.
Tue, 12 Jul 2011, 13:52
shroom_monk
Nice to hear that you're finding it easier. Keep it up!

-=-=-
A mushroom a day keeps the doctor away...

Keep It Simple, Shroom!